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Cabin on the Cliffs

Posted by Melanie, August 12, 2015

Why would any woman in her right mind, desire, or need,  rent a cabin alone in the middle of the summer for two weeks, a cabin that overlooks the river and sits on a cliff, a place that ensures either loneliness or alone-ness, why would her desire be so great? 

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A Pilgrimage

Posted by Chris, February 4, 2015

This month I was able to take a class at St George’s College in Jerusalem, which is an enclosed campus housing the Anglican Cathedral with guest housing and diocesan offices. The class, The Palestine of Jesus, essentially followed the Gospels throughout Israel. Each day we saw something new at various sites while reading the corresponding part of the Gospel.

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Holy Land 2013 | Blog 5 | Conflict

Posted by Ann, February 10, 2013

Here’s a reflection from pilgrim, Betsy Powell:

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Holy Land 2013 | Blog 1

Posted by Ann, February 4, 2013

Arriving in Jerusalem is an assault to the senses. The sunlight is bright and unfiltered, the air is clear. The sounds of birds and kids’ voices and car horns and calls to prayer compete for my attention with the smells of fresh-baked bread, incense, and car exhaust. How could I forget the glory of olives at every meal? Walking in the Old City, I lose my way easily, but my bones remember the hardness of these ancient stones.

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Aging Gracefully

Posted by Pierce, May 13, 2012

Every year, we celebrate National Older Americans Month in May. When I was younger and wrote about such things, I did it mostly from imagination. Now I’m on the other side of the slope with a total hip replacement and other adjustments I won’t go into. I used to have a body that did my bidding without having to ask twice. But those days are long gone. I also thought I could do anything. Anything! A lot of water has gone under the bridge since those days. I still believe I can do anything and everything, but there are moments when all the parts don’t quite work the way they used to. The only option might be to let something happen to me that I used to scorn – namely, to become a person who didn’t seem to be totally in charge. I’m not that far away from relying on a handful of pills to keep me alive for one more day, that is, if I remember to take them! The other thing I notice is that many people are now smarter than I am: frankly, I didn’t think there used to be many. Today, people are born knowing how to do things confound my best efforts to master them. My own children are starting to forbid me from doing things, but in a nice way. They sometimes think I bite off more than I can chew. But what I do have to give, I remember getting when I was younger. There’s nothing like the wisdom of experience. I have been lucky enough to get it from many and it might just be my time to dispense it, even and in spite of the fact that not everything is working. Blessed aging!

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Lenten Blog: Christian Practices

Posted by Pierce, March 2, 2012

Last week, I had coffee with a neighbor of mine who is a devout Muslim. He was asking me questions about the faith of an Episcopalian. Mind you, I was talking to someone who practices his faith. He, just like most Muslims, prays five times a day at certain hours, he reads his sacred scripture frequently, attends services weekly, and gives away 20 percent of his income to charitable causes. I remember an Islamic (Christian) scholar once telling me, “everything you think about Muslim life is inaccurate.” My neighbor reminded me of these misconceptions in our conversation about his faith. When he asked about Episcopalians’ prayer life and what I knew about it, I told him most people tell me they pray when they are in the car or during a crisis, sometimes grace at meals and I know a few who actually get down on their knees before bed at night. When I finished my outline describing the practices of Episcopalians, I felt a dagger enter my heart when he observed: “Episcopalians seem to live like atheists.” 

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Holy Land Trip Sat / Oct 29

Posted by Ann, October 29, 2011

We came full circle yesterday when we made a visit to the Holy Land Institute for the Deaf in Salt, Jordan. This mission to deaf and profound hearing loss children has been operating since 1965. 160 children, as young as three and up to 20 years old, live together in this colorful, harmonious boarding facility designed to create one big family where everyone speaks sign language. The Holy Land Institute has long been dear to Christ Church missioners. Not only have we given our treasure in years past, we have also given time and talent. Some of our parishioners have spent time volunteering at the institute. Under the capable leadership of Audrey Grissom, and supporters like Joanne Metcalf, this vital ministry to the Holy Land was nurtured. While our commitment to the Holy Land hasn’t wavered, our support for the Institute has waned over the last few years.annblog1029boy.jpg

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Holy Land Trip Fri / Oct 28

Posted by Ann, October 28, 2011

Random reflections about Jordan:

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Holy Land Trip Thurs / Oct 27

Posted by Ann, October 27, 2011

Children of the Middle East who have disabilities are often hidden away because of the shame it can bring to families. In this culture, a disability is a black mark on the family’s honor and may affect the positive marriage potential of the other children in the family.

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Holy Land Trip Wed / Oct 26

Posted by Ann, October 26, 2011

Some of you may remember that my brother died in May of 2010. My family scattered Rob’s ashes in the desert outside San Diego in June of that year and again in the Vermont woods in July. I knew at that point that I would be making a Holy Land pilgrimage the following December with the group from Christ Church, so I reserved a small baggie of ashes with the intention of spreading them somewhere in the Holy Land.

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