Blog

blogmainhdr.jpg

Sabbath Time

Posted by Heather, July 25, 2012

A more reasonable person would have already written their blog post before going on vacation. But this still reasonable person was busy at full tilt before going away on vacation, and so this did not get done until on vacation. My husband and I have tried really hard to be fully on vacation and to not be working at work things. Like many of you, both of us have work that does not stay neatly in the 9 to 5 work world (or even in the 8 to 6 work world!). So, when we can really be away, it is good for all of us -- each of us as individuals, the two of us as a couple and as parents, and the four of us as a family.

continue reading...

 

Opinions on our Church

Posted by Ann, July 23, 2012

Since General Convention, the Episcopal Church has been taking quite a beating on op-ed pages and in the blogosphere. I was particularly incensed by Ross Douthat’s (Washington Post, Sunday, July 15) suggestion that we are losing numbers because of our liberal tendencies and lack of theology.

continue reading...

 

2012 Olympics

Posted by Pierce, July 18, 2012

Many of us are glued to the television watching the pre-trials for the Olympics in anticipation of the day when the torch reaches London. Contrary to its origin, the Olympic games have become rites of national pride vetting one country against another with the occasional excitement of a Cinderella country that produces an unexpected champion. Obsessive tabulation of each country’s medal count is a reminder that these games serve political purposes.

continue reading...

 

The Busy Trap

Posted by Ann, July 3, 2012

OK, I am completely convicted by the Sunday, July 1, NY Times op-ed piece by Time Kreider called The Busy Trap. Just that morning at church, I had twice responded to a parishioner’s question, How are you?, with not one but two of his “default responses:” I had answered, “Crazy busy,” to one and “exhausted,” to the other. Even now, as I reread the article, my mind is throwing up all kinds of excuses like: “ A priest’s work is never done.” Or the defense: “But it’s really true!”

continue reading...

 

Taking the Bible Challenge

Posted by Heather, May 12, 2012

I know this won't surprise you. There are a lot of bibles in my house. We have study bibles, bibles in Greek (both of ours) and Hebrew (David's), old family bibles, and a few art bibles, one with medieval artwork in it and one with modern art and medieval-style hand calligraphy. We have a variety of translations, from the King James Version to the NRSV (that's what we read from in church) to a new translation, the Common English Bible, that is meant to be scholarly and contemporary to American English idioms as they are in the 21st century so far. We also regularly use online versions of the Bible, such as at bible.oremus.org, and David has a free Bible app on his phone. But most of the time if there is a Bible being read in our house, one of our daughters is reading it.

continue reading...

 

Fathers & Daughters

Posted by Pierce, March 14, 2012

The day my daughter invited me to join her Indian Princess troop (pre-Girl Scout training), it changed our relationship. The two of us met once a week with eight other pairs of fathers and daughters, a group designed to do something fathers and their daughters don’t often do enough: spend time together. We had campouts and a lot of fun picking our Indian names, but we also had guest speakers talk about messages the media sends to girls about how their bodies should look, domestic violence, depression, and one night, we learned to swing dance. That came in handy years later at my oldest daughter’s wedding. The relationship between fathers and daughters is often caricatured as one in which a clueless dad is stunned as his eye-rolling progeny blows past him on her way to the mall. But of course, the interaction between dads and daughters is far more complex. It not only sets an example for the kind of partner a girl may choose as she gets older, but also affects the way she sees herself. Research shows that fathers who are close to their daughters early on still eventually drift apart as the girl hits her teenage years. So I’m glad instead of being an onlooker during her early years, we found a way to communicate and exchange wisdom built upon experiences together. I remember one time when my younger daughter asked me if I thought she was fat. I stumbled through the answer, realizing that the answer wasn’t as important as the question. It led me to realize that the influences around my daughter telling her she had to look a certain way were more powerful than her mother and I. It was then I decided to read Margo Maine’s book entitled Father Hunger: Fathers, Daughters, and the Pursuit of Thinness. In it, she discovered that since daughters were generally disconnected from their fathers and desperate for approval and not getting it, it often led to food disorders. As a result, I stayed close and was clear that what I said mattered to her. Even the most innocuous comment from a father about his daughter’s appearance can be injurious. Better yet, all the dads in the group began writing CEOs of companies insisting they pull ads that perpetuate negative stereotypes for girls. I always ended mine with “Is this the message you want to send to your daughter?”

continue reading...

 

Lessons Learned from Our Chidren

Posted by Heather, February 28, 2012

On Maundy Thursday, I was surprised by the reaction of my daughters to the end of the worship service. Similar to many Episcopal churches, Christ Church does a stripping of the altar. The communion ware is removed to the sacristy, as are the altar book, frontal hanging of the altar, and a few kneelers. The stoles that the clergy wear are removed and given up. Even the cross, which sits on the altar at Christ Church, is removed. My daughters were really disturbed by this. I could see them in the front pew, mouthing to me "What is going on? Why are they doing this? Why are they taking away the church things?" At the same time as trying to kneel and pray myself, I was mouthing back to them, "It is all okay. Everything is fine. We will talk about it later."

continue reading...

 

Just Talk!

Posted by Ann, February 11, 2012

Just finished reading the in-depth and very disturbing piece in the February 6 New Yorker, The Story of a Suicide by Ian Parker. It provides much background to the suicide of Tyler Clementi, the young Rutgers freshman who jumped off the George Washington Bridge in October of 2010, after his roommate posted images online of a romantic encounter with another man. Of course it reveals much more nuance than Clementi was outed and was the victim of a hate crime. But the most astonishing thing we learn is that the two roommates barely spoke to one another.

continue reading...

 
login